Thaipusam

Held annually at the full moon in the tenth month of the Hindu calendar, which falls between mid-January and mid-February in the Gregorian calendar, Thaipusam is a significant Hindu ceremony. In Malaysia, there is a public holiday to celebrate it.

Thaipusam in 2024, 2025, and 2026:

YearDateDayHolidayStates
202425 JanThursdayThaipusamJohor, Kuala Lumpur, Negeri
Sembilan, Penang, Perak, Putrajaya
& Selangor
202511 FebTuesdayThaipusamJohor, Kedah, Kuala Lumpur,
Negeri Sembilan, Penang, Perak,
Putrajaya & Selangor
20261 FebSundayThaipusamJohor, Kedah, Kuala Lumpur,
Negeri Sembilan, Penang, Perak,
Putrajaya & Selangor
2 FebMondayThaipusam HolidayKuala Lumpur, Negeri Sembilan,
Penang, Perak, Putrajaya &
Selangor

These dates are estimated. We will update this page once the official announcement is out.

Only in Kuala Lumpur, Putrajaya, Johor, Negeri Sembilan, Perak, Penang, and Selangor is Thaipusam often observed as a public holiday.

Every year, millions of Hindu devotees participate in one of the most fervent spiritual events on the planet—Thaipusam.

Traditionally, Thaipusam occurs with a full moon. The festival honors Lord Muragan, the Hindu deity of war, who is revered in sacred mythology for having vanquished three demonic spirits in the service of righteousness.

On the first day of Thaipusam, a statue of Lord Muragan is presented during a parade through Kuala Lumpur’s streets by a chariot. To fulfill the vows, there is a lengthy barefoot walk to the Batu Caves on the second day.

Usually, the highlight of the festivities is the stroll to the Batu Caves. Some pilgrims may bring elaborate frames (kavadi) and big milk jugs on their journey. As a sign of penance, the kavadi are held aloft by a set of spikes that penetrate their flesh on their backs and chests laterally.

Devotees are welcomed by a 42.7 m statue of Lord Muragan as they arrive in the caverns. After that, they will ascend a huge stairway to reach the limestone caverns, which are lined with shrines that are ready for offerings.

Those who have chosen to wear the kavadi will have mostly followed a very limited diet in the month before the journey, and they will fast entirely in the final few days before the pilgrimage. These extremes, of course, call for an extremely high degree of mental and physical fortitude.

Many devotees who go on the pilgrimage choose to carry a pot of milk instead of getting their flesh pierced with hooks, since the Hindu religion views this as a sign of plenty and fertility. Thaipusam is seen by many Hindu believers as a sign of fidelity and commitment between humans and the gods. It may be viewed as a way to express gratitude to Lord Muragan for answering any requests.

In keeping with tradition, attendees of the celebration will present Lord Muragan with presents of orange and yellow fruits and flowers while donning apparel of the same hues. Offerings are offered to a great many different shrines, the most well-known of which are located in the Batu Caves.

Every year, almost a million people assemble in the Batu Caves in Kuala Lumpur to celebrate Thaipusam, a national holiday marked by parades and ceremonies in which believers execute ceremonial actions at various sites. Visitors swarm to see Thaipusam’s vibrant colors, lively atmosphere, and activities.

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